Monday, March 21, 2005

Harvesting Comments

Seems if I post about gardening or home schooling I get comments! I like comments - they mean not only are folks reading but that I'm connecting. Did a lesson on connecting with your reader today - used Miss Malarkey Won't Be In Today, a delightful book to which every student and teacher can relate. I must admit the gardening comments aren't nearly as opinionated as the home schooling ones!



Miss Malarkey Posted by Hello


We have a lot line house, the lots in my part of town are in high demand and have become pricey. Folks who live in the Houston Heights don't expect suburban yards, in fact it's one of the attractions.

We have a small pocket garden out back - we've a table & chairs there, with a side bed and vines all around to hide the fence. The primroses in side bed are about gone, but the ferns are thriving in all the rain we've had.


Sappo, Belitus & Butch Posted by Hello

We've no grass, only ground cover. The Australian Violets stay green all year and reward me with purple flowers during our spring.


Australian violets Posted by Hello

The daffodils are a memory, now I've herbs and geraiums in the front bed.

Herbs & Flowers Posted by Hello


Front Bed Posted by Hello

4 comments:

Julie said...

Beautiful garden, beautiful photos. Here in southeastern Michigan we don't even have snowdrops yet. I haven't seen a single crocus, either -- except in the seed catalog!

KarbonKountyMoos said...

It's snowing here right now!

Great photos - something to look forward to. I did see two robins this morning & a red winged blackbird yesterday.

homuncula said...

Wow, I love your garden, it's so green and lush! Everything is still dead with piles of snow in the shade here in northern Indiana. Those statues are gorgeous too!

Mummy/Crit said...

I love the idea of growing viola hederacea in Houston, but it freaks me out a bit...like seeing eucalyptus in California and callistemon in Florida...presumably it doesn't get cold enough in Houston to kill off the violets in winter...they always bounce back in spring after the frosts here...